Confirmation, Belief, and Unbelief

This past we celebrated Ethan’s Confirmation of Faith.

In our church, this is a time where students who have attended a weekly time of worship, teaching and small group time for three years say they are ready and desire to make profession of their faith in Jesus Christ.

There are many things they have to do to reach this milestone and proclaim their faith in front of their family, peers, and church.

Though most students come to this time and want to be confirmed, the honest part is their faith is not perfect. Some actually will say they have grown but are still unsure of where they are at. After leading Taylor’s group and now Ethan’s, I’ve come to realize how an honest view of where you’re at in your faith is actually beautiful.

Ethan
Let’s be real: our faith is not based on just emotion or feeling though they are involved.

So many parts make up the faith that God has given us.

It’s God first and foremost that makes belief in Him possible. We love Him because he first loved us.

Yet when we mixed in the world and it’s allures and distractions it can get messy.

So why is it beautiful?

Because to hear these young lads ask questions means it’s important to them and they want to know. They are seeking Jesus.

Jesus said, “Seek Me and you will find Me.” WILL find me. Not MAYBE but WILL.

I think of the father who’s son was possessed by an evil spirit. The disciples tried to cast it out and they couldn’t. So the father goes directly to Jesus and asks Jesus to heal his son of his sickness. Jesus then asks the father THE question.

“Do you believe?” Jesus asked.

This father in his humility, fear, and desire to help his boy said, “Yes I believe. Help my unbelief.”

That’s being honest. That’s real. That’s beautiful.

I think that’s why Jesus then healed this man’s son–to help his unbelief. To show the father his honesty was covered in grace.

Jesus would understand the heart of a parent yes? And let us not forget, he loved that son.

Maybe He wanted to teach the disciples to judge less for an “As Is” situation and meet the person where He was.

Jesus sees the heart. We can trust Him with what He sees in our heart…even if we have our times of unbelief.

Ask for help in your unbelief. Meet Jesus in it. Seek Him you will find Him.

It’s okay.

If that’s where you are right now, I wrote a song about this very thing. It’s called “Yes, I Believe.” Maybe you’ll find it helpful. Here’s the link.

I’m grateful for the courage of my son and his friends to be honest and care enough to say “I believe” in front of each other and yet still ask hard questions.

Have you struggled with a season of unbelief or wrestled with hard questions? I’d love to hear about your experience in the comments.

God is good all the time.
Peder

Little House On The Prairie

I saw a clip of “Little House on the Prairie” the other day. Yes, there might have been some heart grabbing moments and memories of watching the show when I was a kid. (FYI, not many guys are willing to say they watched this show…but I am that guy!)

This show is set in the settling of family in Walnut Grove, Minnesota, and often shows us a picture of simple farm life. No TVs, no electricity, no email, no iPhones, etc. You get it.

It got me thinking about how often we stay up late trying to find something to watch or play. How often are we looking for the next text, email, news item totally missing what’s happening in front of us?

photo credit

photo credit: TheSeafarer via photopin cc

When the message comes, we feel we’d better respond right away or else the person will think we’re mad, dead, or worse yet, they might find someone else to take our place in getting their attention!

Seriously.

This isn’t new information for most of us.

But when’s the last time you sat down to really think about it?

In “Little House on the Prairie,” they went to bed pretty much when the sun went down. They were not exactly searching DirecTV for a movie to watch until midnight or Facebooking until all hours of the morning.

They were sleeping. They were giving the body the rest it needed.

They got up about the time the sun came up and started over. They went to things around the time they were supposed to happen. If they mailed a letter to someone, they would look forward to the reply knowing it would come when it would come.

Much less stress and a lot more patience. Life was about people, family, really hard work, community, and patience.

I wonder if I would be willing to trade the speed of life today for then.

I love technology. I really do. I definitely don’t want to go back to polio, malaria, yellow fever, etc. icky…

But I think back then the food would have been better. (Sorry Taco Johns fans). I think relationships could be deeper sometimes. Winters would be harder (though I give this year’s an A+ for effort). Ministry would look different…

I’m just thinking out loud, friends.

My questions: is how much less stress would the body feel? Less rushing? Less need to spin so many plates?

What do you think? Do you have any insight? Do you think you could live in that kind of a world?

I welcome your words.

God is good all the time

Peder